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The standard edition of the works of Beddoes is The Works of Thomas Lovell Beddoes (1935), edited by H.W. Donner and published by Oxford University Press. Outstanding editions of Death’s Jest-Book, Beddoes’ major drama, have appeared in recent years: Death’s Jest-Book: The 1829 Text (2003), edited by Michael Bradshaw and published by Routledge, and Death’s Jest-Book or The Day Will Come: A New Edition of the γ Text Established by H.W. Donner (2003), edited by Alan Halsey and published by West House Books in association with the Thomas Lovell Beddoes Society.

Some early editions of Beddoes’ writings are now available online:

Death’s Jest-Book [1850, Edited by T.F. Kelsall]

Poems by the Late Thomas Lovell Beddoes [1851, Edited by T.F. Kelsall]

The Poems Posthumous and Collected of Thomas Lovell Beddoes, Vol. 2 [1851, Edited by T.F. Kelsall]

The Poetical Works of Thomas Lovell Beddoes, Vol. 1 [1890, Edited by Edmund Gosse]

The Poetical Works of Thomas Lovell Beddoes, Vol. 2 [1890, Edited by Edmund Gosse]

The Letters of Thomas Lovell Beddoes [1894, Edited by Edmund Gosse]

A pdf copy of the first printing of The Brides’ Tragedy is available from Google books:

The Brides’ Tragedy [1822, Printed by Rivington]

A new electronic edition of The Brides’ Tragedy has also been published:

The Brides’ Tragedy [Edited by David Baulch]

The following texts are from The Poems Posthumous and Collected of Thomas Lovell Beddoes (London: William Pickering, 1851), edited by Thomas Forbes Kelsall.

For some perspective on the Kelsall edition, select this link.

Dramas: The Brides’ Tragedy: Original Dedication | Act I | Act II | Act III | Act IV | Act V or the Entire Drama | Death’s Jest-Book: Act I | Act II | Act III | Act IV | Act V or the Entire Drama | The Second Brother; An Unfinished Drama: Act I | Act II | Act III | Act IV or the Entire Unfinished Drama | Torrismond; An Unfinished Drama

Dramatic Scenes and Fragments: (Kelsall writes, “such of them, as were apparently intended for insertion in the ‘Death’s Jest-Book,’ are here distinguished by the letters D.I.B.”) Anticipation of Evil Tidings | An Apotheosis | A Beautiful Night | “Bona de Mortuis” | Concealed Joy | A Countenance Foreboding Evil | A Crocodile | A Day of Surpassing Beauty | Dirge (“No Tears…”) | A Dream | Dream of Dying | Erminia Abbandonata | Extreme Acclivity | A Great Sacrifice Self-Compensated | Human Life: Its Value | Humble Beginnings | Insignificance of the World | The Israelite Amid Philistines | Kisses | Life a Glass Window | Life’s Uncertainty | A Lofty Mind | “Love is Wiser than Ambition” | Lovers’ Identity | Man’s Anxious, but Ineffectual, Guard against Death | Man’s Petty Universe Contrasted with the True | Meditation | Metaphor of Rain | Midnight Hymn | The Mourners Consoled | The Murderer’s Haunted Couch | A Night-Scene | Prison Thoughts | Rain | Reception of Evil Tidings | Recognition | Recollection of Early Life | Rosily Dying | A Ruffian | Sad and Cheerful Songs Contrasted | Sleeper’s Countenance Contemplated | The Slight and Degenerate Nature of Man | Sorrow | Speaker’s Meaning Dimly Descried | Subterranean City | A Subterranean City | Sweet to Die

Poems: Alfarabi; the World Maker: A Rhapsodical Fragment | Alpine Spirit’s Song | Another Dirge | Another Letter to the Same [B.W. Procter]: from Göttingen; March, 1826 | Ballad of Human Life | The Boding Dreams | Bridal Serenade | Dial-Thoughts | A Dirge | Dirge and Hymeneal | Dirge (“If Thou…”) | Dirge (“Let Dew…”) | Dirge (“To Her Couch…”) | Dirge (“We Do Lie…”) | Doomsday | Dream-Pedlary | L’Envoi | Epitaph | From the German | The Ghosts’ Moonshine | A Lament | Letter to B.W. Procter, Esq.: From Oxford; May, 1825 | The Lily of the Valley | Lines (“All Kingdomless…”) | Lines (“Although My Old…”) | Lines (“Folly Hath…”) | Lines (“Mummies and Skeletons…”) | Lines (“The Knight…”) | Lines, Written at Geneva; July, 1824 | Lines Written in a Blank Leaf of the ‘Prometheus Unbound’ | Love-in-Idleness | Love’s Last Messages | The Median Supper | Music and Song | The New-Born Star | The Phantom-Wooer | Pygmalion | The Reason Why | The Romance of the Lily | The Runaway | Song (“A Cypress Bough…”) | Song (“A Ho…”) | Song by Isbrand | Song by Siegfried | Song, by Two Voices | Song from the Ship | Song (“How Many Times…”) | Song in the Air | Song (“My Goblet’s Golden…”) | Song of the Stygian Naiades | Song (“Old Adam…”) | Song on the Water (“As Mad Sexton’s Bell…”) | Song, on the Water (“Wild with Passion…”) | Song (“Poor Old Pilgrim…”) | Song (“Strew Not Earth…”) | Song (“Strike, You Myrtle-Crowned…”) | Song: Translated from the German of Walther von der Vogelweide | Song (“We Have Bathed…”) | Sonnet: To Tartar, A Terrier Beauty | Stanzas (from The Ivory Gate) | Threnody (“Far Away…”) | Threnody (“No Sunny Ray…”) | To My Lyre | The Tree of Life | The Two Archers | A Voice from the Waters | Voices in the Air

These poems are from The Poetical Works of Thomas Lovell Beddoes (London: J.M. Dent and Co., 1890), edited by Edmund Gosse:

The Comet | The Flowery Alchemist | Fragment (“A Veined Petal…”) | Fragment (“Folly Hath Now…”) | Lord Alcohol | The Old Ghost | The Oviparous Tailor | Silenus in Proteus | Song (“The Snake Is…”) | Sonnet to Zoë King | To a Bunch of Grapes | Written in Album at Clifton; March, 1828

Index by First Line (this only covers the individual Kelsall and Gosse texts above)

German Poems, 1837-45: Die Schnecke und der Hirsch | Auf den Neujahrstag 1839 | Antistraussianischer Gruss | Der Weltvogel | Epigram | An den ‘Beobachter aus der Östl. Schweiz’ (1) | Antwort an den ‘Beobachter aus der Östl. Schweiz’ | An den grossen Rath | An den ‘Beobachter aus der Östlichen Schweiz’ | An die Urheber des 6. Septembers | An Beobachter, Wochen- und Schulzeitung | An den ‘Beobachter aus der Östl. Schweiz’ (2) | An die Zürcherische Freitagszeitung | An die Wochenzeitung | An den Apostaten Baumgartner

Additional Poems and Fragments: Drinking Song | Drinking Song (2)

The source of the following letters is The Letters of Thomas Lovell Beddoes (London: Elkin Mathews & John Lane, 1894), edited by Edmund Gosse.

Letter 1: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1824 | Letter 2: To Bryan Waller Procter, 1824 | Letter 3: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1824 | Letter 4: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1824 | Letter 5: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1824 | Letter 6: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1824 | Letter 7: To Bryan Waller Procter, 1824 | Letter 8: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1824 | Letter 9: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1824 | Letter 10: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1824 | Letter 11: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1824 | Letter 12: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1825 | Letter 13: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1825 | Letter 14: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1825 | Letter 15: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1825 | Letter 16: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1825 | Letter 17: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1825 | Letter 18: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1825 | Letter 19: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1825 | Letter 20: To Bryan Waller Procter, 1826 | Letter 21: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1826 | Letter 22: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1826 | Letter 23: To Bryan Waller Procter, 1826 | Letter 24: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1827 | Letter 25: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1827 | Letter 26: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1827 | Letter 27: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1828 | Letter 28: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1829 | Letter 29: To Bryan Waller Procter, 1829 | Letter 30: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1829 | Letter 31: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1830 | Letter 32: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1831 | Letter 33: To Revell Phillips, 1832 | Letter 34: To Revell Phillips, 1832 | Letter 35: To Revell Phillips, 1833 | Letter 36: To Revell Phillips, 1834 | Letter 37: To Revell Phillips, 1834 | Letter 38: To Revell Phillips, 1835 | Letter 39: To Revell Phillips, 1835 | Letter 40: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1837 | Letter 41: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1837 | Letter 42: To Revell Phillips, 1838 | Letter 43: To Revell Phillips, 1839 | Letter 44: To Revell Phillips, 1839 | Letter 45: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1844 | Letter 46: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1846 | Letter 47: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1847 | Letter 48: To Thomas Forbes Kelsall, 1847 | Letter 49: To A Relative, 1848 | Letter 50: To A Relative, 1848 | Letter 51: To Revell Phillips, 1849

In 1818, the year in which he turned fifteen, Beddoes wrote the tale, Scaroni, or The Mysterious Cave